Category Archives: Reference Guides

Video Book Review of World History by Philip Parker

Photo Courtesy of Amazon

Photo Courtesy of Amazon

Where do I start? I have been asking myself why no one has made a widely sold book that spans the entirety of our human history and explains it all. That was until I found, and fell in love with, Phillip Parker’s version, published in 2010 by Sterling Publishing.

Unlike most history books which only cover specific eras in great detail, this title brings us all the way back to the prehistoric age and covers the first ever recorded humanoid, Australopithecus; and travels down to Homo Habilis and Homo Erectus, before covering the well known Neanderthal.  The book spends less time detailing aspects of each era and can be used more like a timeline guide for history; speaking of which, the book does include a handy timeline conveniently placed at the commencement of the book and a reference guide towards the end; detailing every war, battle and ruler on respective tables.

In my personal opinion, this book is the perfect companion piece to any history text book used in college or high school. Most classes have a standard text book and a companion book to go with it; this book could eliminate all other companion books used for history courses, as it covers every era and presents all the reference guides one would ever need.

However, I’d also recommend this book for those not currently enrolled in a course, and seems to be the perfect alternative for someone who is interested in history, would like to know how and when certain things happened, but doesn’t want to spend too much time figuring it out.

On average, the book spends 1-4 pages on each civilization which is divided into 3 sections for each historical occurrence for that time period. But as the book is a reference for the whole of human history, it covers each culture various times throughout, as the centuries progress. It is divided into 7 main chapters that begin with the prehistoric world and ends in the modern world.

An example of its breakdown is seen clearer in the chapter labeled “The Classical World” which spans between 400 BCE to 600 CE, in which Celtic and Germanic Europe, India and The People of Steppes are all covered in 6 pages as follows:

Celtic and Germanic Europe 

  • The Celts’
  • Successor States to Rome

People of Steppes

  • The Scythians
  • The Huns
  • The Kushans

India

  • Chandragupta and the Rise of the Mauryans
  • Ashoka and Buddhism
  • Gupta India

Before entering into a periodical, 2 page centerfold examination of other interesting occurrences or relevant information, not directly covered in the book. There are a few of these that give the reader a bit more reference to understand what they are reading. This book is perfect for the person looking to get their information and go; all of these events were covered in just 8 pages and gave me the meat and potatoes of what I wanted and needed to know.

It covers the discovery of the Americas, all it’s voyages and details the great navigators of the time. Later on the modern world is covered, including the current world wars and conflicts. Everything you would ever want to know, about any time in history, is covered in this convenient 512 page book, that is small enough to fit in any small bag or purse.

The book comes complete with visual guides, pictures and captions relevant to the current text and opens with an explanation of what the meaning of history is.

Overall I would recommend this book, which I purchased at Barnes and Noble, and would recommend it as an essential companion piece to any history course.

Purchase the book at Barnes and Noble 
Purchase World History on Amazon
Purchase World History on AbeBooks
ISBN 9781435138957

Video Reviews

So, I’ve gotten a few emails regarding some of the books I have done reviews on. Some of my readers have asked for more in-depth reviews on why I feel that a book is a good choice or why I don’t like it, reference books in particular. So I’ll be doing video reviews on these reference books, so you can see what you’ll be getting before you buy.

Book Review: A Dark History: Tutors

Screen Shot 2015-02-28 at 3.15.17 AM

1/5 Stars

imageAs a Tutor fan myself, I look for many writings that cover the rein of the Tudors and their successors, and thus I nabbed this book by Judith Jones. I cannot say that I am in love with this book, because I simply am not.

This book, like many of the others I have reviewed, is a reference book more than a novel type book. I contains many of the picture references expected of a Sterling Metro Book and informational side tables; much like those of A World History by Phillip Parker, for which I also did a review.

However, where Parker’s book offers cohesive and well timed reference panels, John’s book does not. This book offers great information in terms of the early years of the Tutor rein and circumstances and of the dynasty as a whole, however it is not put together well, or written in a way that flows well.

This book is written in a fashion, as to say, a writer who has so many collected thoughts and wants to express them to you, but stops every so often to talk about something else, as not to forget it later. While this works well in a conversation, it is horrible in a book. Constantly bouncing back and fourth between the main text and “oh let me just tell you this detail before I continue”, just makes it seem like the author did not properly outline her work well before she started and was just writing off the top of her head. And I am astonished that an editor at Sterling Publishing did not capture this.

Again, the information offered is good and different from what most books have in ways, but it does not offer a compelling difference, enough to endure the torturous lack of formatting.

The information panels in this book are also horribly formatted, often starting in the middle of a sentient on one page, to locate the panel on the next page, and then finishing the sentence in the following page; rather than locating the panels at the end of sections, or paragraphs like most Metro Books.

Some of the information is inaccurate as well; the production team on this book did not bother to fact check. On one page a photograph of a letter is described by the author as a letter from King Henry VII to Queen Isabella, in reference to the betrothed of their children. When in fact, any Spanish, Italian, Latin, Portuguese, or French speaking person can read on the document, that it is a love letter to Catherine of Aragon by Prince Arthur.

Anyone who is a fan of medieval and Renaissance history must encounter the Tutors somewhere along the way; and whether partial to them or not, it cannot be said that this family was not a staple in the word history itself. It saddens me that this book is available for sale to readers who may not know much of the Tutors and are going to be fed erroneous information within bad, confusing formatting.

My final thought: this book needs an overhaul. I do not recommend it. Purchase a more accurate reference book that flows well. This is a sad addition to the “A Dark History” collection and a sad day for the Tutors.

© C. J. Leger October 16, 2014

Book Review: A Writer’s Resource 2nd Edition

a writers resourceThere are a few editions of this great book, but by far the best one is the 2nd edition, which still cost more than its successors on most platforms. This book is an indispensable resource for writers, and while it focuses on writing for college students, it offers incredible reference for later in life.

This edition of the book includes a new section for multimedia assignments, which its predecessor did not; and it includes tabs for APA and Chicago MLA writing styles. This edition of A Writer’s Resource boasts 13 tab sections immaculately separated and are as follows:

  • mhee.com online resource code
  • Learning across the curriculum
  • Writing and designing papers
  • Common assignments across the curriculum

The tab sections that follow these are geared towards writing after college, and are what make this book a necessary resource for writers after they’re on their own.

  • Writing beyond College
  • Researching
  • MLA Documentation Style
  • APA Documentation Style
  • Other Documentation Styles
  • Editing for Clarity
  • Editing for Grammar Conventions
  • Editing for Correctness
  • Basic Grammar Review
  • Further Resources for Learning

Each tab also includes sub-tabs which cover everything from comma placements to sentence restructuring. On the back flap of this book, the reader will find a column stile rundown of resources within the book that writers can use. This section highlights resources such as how to avoid writer’s block which is found on page 53, comma splices and run-ons, located on page 471.

Similar to World History, for which I also did a review, A Writer’s Resource placed a handy world map towards the back of the book, along with a timeline of world history, which covers the founding of Babylon in 3000 BCE to Hurricane Katrina in 2005. A glossary for selected terms follows the timeline, explaining terms like Fascism, Modernism and The Big Bang Theory. Furthermore, right before the index, the reader will find a resource for multilingual writers which explains articles, verbs and sentence structure in depth.

Overall I recommend this book to any writer who is managing the production of their books, articles, and stories on their own without the help of an editor. This book is an invaluable resource for writers with limited resources and want to get their content right; but it also makes a great companion for any author who wants to hone their technical skills to match their creative prowess.

Purchase A Writer's Resource on Amazon 
Purchase a Writer's Resource at Barnes & Noble 
ISBN-13: 978-0-07-296209-3
ISBN-10: 0-07-296209-7
Authors: 
Elaine P. Maimon, Janice H. Pervitz, Kathleen Blake Yancey

© C. J. Leger September 19, 2014

Book Review: World History by Phillip Parker

Photo Courtesy of Amazon

Photo Courtesy of Amazon

Where do I start? I have been asking myself why no one has made a widely sold book that spans the entirety of our human history and explains it all. That was until I found, and fell in love with, Phillip Parker’s version, published in 2010 by Sterling Publishing.

Unlike most history books which only cover specific eras in great detail, this title brings us all the way back to the prehistoric age and covers the first ever recorded humanoid, Australopithecus; and travels down to Homo Habilis and Homo Erectus, before covering the well known Neanderthal.  The book spends less time detailing aspects of each era and can be used more like a timeline guide for history; speaking of which, the book does include a handy timeline conveniently placed at the commencement of the book and a reference guide towards the end; detailing every war, battle and ruler on respective tables.

In my personal opinion, this book is the perfect companion piece to any history text book used in college or high school. Most classes have a standard text book and a companion book to go with it; this book could eliminate all other companion books used for history courses, as it covers every era and presents all the reference guides one would ever need.

However, I’d also recommend this book for those not currently enrolled in a course, and seems to be the perfect alternative for someone who is interested in history, would like to know how and when certain things happened, but doesn’t want to spend too much time figuring it out.

On average, the book spends 1-4 pages on each civilization which is divided into 3 sections for each historical occurrence for that time period. But as the book is a reference for the whole of human history, it covers each culture various times throughout, as the centuries progress. It is divided into 7 main chapters that begin with the prehistoric world and ends in the modern world.

An example of its breakdown is seen clearer in the chapter labeled “The Classical World” which spans between 400 BCE to 600 CE, in which Celtic and Germanic Europe, India and The People of Steppes are all covered in 6 pages as follows:

Celtic and Germanic Europe 

  • The Celts’
  • Successor States to Rome

People of Steppes

  • The Scythians
  • The Huns
  • The Kushans

India

  • Chandragupta and the Rise of the Mauryans
  • Ashoka and Buddhism
  • Gupta India

Before entering into a periodical, 2 page centerfold examination of other interesting occurrences or relevant information, not directly covered in the book. There are a few of these that give the reader a bit more reference to understand what they are reading. This book is perfect for the person looking to get their information and go; all of these events were covered in just 8 pages and gave me the meat and potatoes of what I wanted and needed to know.

It covers the discovery of the Americas, all it’s voyages and details the great navigators of the time. Later on the modern world is covered, including the current world wars and conflicts. Everything you would ever want to know, about any time in history, is covered in this convenient 512 page book, that is small enough to fit in any small bag or purse.

The book comes complete with visual guides, pictures and captions relevant to the current text and opens with an explanation of what the meaning of history is.

Overall I would recommend this book, which I purchased at Barnes and Noble, and would recommend it as an essential companion piece to any history course.

Purchase the book at Barnes and Noble 
Purchase World History on Amazon
Purchase World History on AbeBooks
ISBN 9781435138957